Telling people what you plan to do

Telling people what you plan to do

Reminder:

You don’t have to tell people what you plan to do. You can just do it — or not do it. Especially if you have a habit of contradicting yourself.

The same applies to making emotionally triggered ultimatums that may not be adhered to when you’ve calmed down.

“It’s just a joke”

Allowing yourself to be the subject of a joke every now and then can show that you don’t take things too seriously. Allowing yourself to become the brunt of jokes regularly can show you don’t take things seriously enough.

Every time you allow someone to disrespect you — even if it’s “just a joke” — you give them permission to do it again.

If you want respect, it’s important to set boundaries.

Friendly ribbing between genuine friends can be a sign of trust and affection, but being frequently showcased as a joke to an audience — particularly people who don’t know you

"It's just a joke" that well — is something else.

When is enough enough? When people are laughing and you’re not one of them.

 

Problem-finding as a sport

Some treat problem-finding like it’s a sport to win. But finding & highlighting problems is easy. Complaining is easy. Mocking & belittling people and/or their efforts is easy.

What isn’t as easy? Being solution-oriented instead of problem-focused & leading by example — & with love.

Problem-finding as a sport

Related:

A difference of opinion

Reminder:

A difference of opinion doesn’t mean someone is against you & it doesn’t mean you can’t be friends — or at least get along.

A respectful disagreement is far more interesting & leads to far more growth than only associating with those who see things exactly as you.

A difference of opinion

Related:

True friendship

True friendship

You’re better off with friends with whom you don’t agree with on everything than you are with friends you do.

One encourages you to see the value in other people’s perspectives while the other tends to paint the world in a way that doesn’t reflect reality.

Cherish the people in your life with whom you can be yourself or disagree with without fear of losing their friendship. This is a far more genuine form of friendship than one in which you’re afraid to express yourself because of what they may think.